Grammar

Using When and Where in Adjective Clause

Using When and Where in Adjective Clause
Using When and Where in Adjective Clause

We have already talked about adjective/relative clauses in English. In the article below I am going to tell you the way of using when and where in adjective clause.

Using When and Where in Adjective Clause

Where:

The conjunctive adverb (where) can be used in adjective clause to give important or extra information about a location that is mentioned in the main clause.

  • The city where Rahimi lived for a long time is located in Texas.
  • The city in which Rahimi lived for a long time is located in Texas.
  • The city which Rahimi lived in for a long time is located in Texas.
  • The city that Rahimi lived in for a long time is located in Texas.
  • The city Rahimi lived in for a long time is located in Texas.
  • The city in that Rahimi lived for a long time is located in Texas. (Incorrect)

When:

The conjunctive adverb (when) can be used in adjective clause to give important or extra information about The time, date, day, month, year, or century which is mentioned in the main clause.

  • Monday, when our lovely prophet came to this world, is a holy day.
  • Monday, on which our lovely prophet came to this world, is a holy day.

Look at some more examples

1. 1492 is the year. Columbus discovered North America in that year.

  • 1492 is the year when Columbus discovered North America.
  • 1492 is the year in which Columbus discovered North America.
  • 1492 is the year that Columbus discovered North America.

2. Beijing is the place. That place has an area in a park called English Corner.

  • Beijing is the place that has an area in a park called English Corner.
  • Beijing is the place which has an area in a park called English Corner.
    You cannot use where. Why? Because the word after that is a verb! See the above rule.

3. English Corner is a pretty section in a local park. In English Corner, people speak only English.

  • English Corner is a pretty section in a local park where people speak only English.
  • English Corner is a pretty section in a local park in which people speak only English.
  • English Corner is a pretty section in a local park which people speak only English in.
  • English Corner is a pretty section in a local park that people speak only English in.

4. I come from a city. In that city, you can go dancing all night long.

  • I come from a city where you can go dancing all night long.
  • I come from a city in which you can go dancing all night long.
  • I come from a city which you can go dancing all night long in.
  • I come from a city that you can go dancing all night long in.

5. Thursday, December 17, 1903, is the day. On that day, history was made because it was the first successful trip in a self-propelled, heavier-than-air flying machine.

  • Thursday, December 17, 1903, is the day when history was made because it was the first successful trip in a self-propelled, heavier-than-air flying machine.
  • Thursday, December 17, 1903, is the day on which history was made because it was the first successful trip in a self-propelled, heavier-than-air flying machine.
  • Thursday, December 17, 1903, is the day which history was made on because it was the first successful trip in a self-propelled, heavier-than-air flying machine.
  • Thursday, December 17, 1903, is the day that history was made on because it was the first successful trip in a self-propelled, heavier-than-air flying machine.

Exercise:

Select the correct option.

1. This is the station _________ Emily met James.

  • a- when
  • b- where
  • c- which

2. July and August are the months_____________ most people go on holiday.

  • a- where
  • b- when
  • c- which

3. Do you know the reason_______________ so many people in the world learn English?

  • a- why
  • b- where
  • c- when

4. This is the church_______________ Sue and Peter got married.

  • a- in which
  • b- in where
  • c- which

5. Edinburgh is the town ____________________ Alexander Graham Bell was born in.

  • a- that
  • b- where
  • c- in which

6. 25 December is the day________________ children in Great Britain get their Christmas presents.

  • a- when
  • b- where
  • c- which

7. A famine was the reason ________________ so many Irish people immigrated to the USA in the 19th century.

  • a- when
  • b- why
  • c- where

8. A greengrocer’s is a shop _______________ you can buy vegetables.

  • a- in where
  • b- where
  • c- which

9. The day ______________ I arrived was very nice.

  • a- where
  • b- on which
  • c- on when

10. A horror film was the reason ___________________ I couldn’t sleep last night.

  • a- that
  • b- when
  • c- where

Answers:

  1. B-where
  2. B-when
  3. A-why
  4. A-in which
  5. B-where
  6. A-when
  7. A-when
  8. B-where
  9. B-on which
  10. That

Using prepositions in adjective clause:

If a proposition is used at the beginning of an adjective clause it is formal English, but if it used at the end of an adjective clause, it is considered informal English.

Study these examples:

  • I know the man. Mary is talking to him.
  • I know the man to whom Mary is talking. (Formal)
  • I know the man who Mary is talking to (Informal)
  • I know the place. You were pointing to it.
  • I know the place to which you were pointing.
  • I know the place which you were pointing to.

Using expressions of quantity in the adjective clause

There are many people in this town. None of them was born in Alaska.

  • There are many people in this town, none of whom was born in Alaska.

There are a lot of things in this store. Most of them were made in China.

  • There are a lot of things in this store, most of which were made in China.

This adjective clause pattern occurs with any expressions of quantity: Some of, many of, most of, none of, two of, half of, both of, neither of, each of, etc. Only whom, which and whose are used in this pattern.

A noun + of + which is sometimes an alternative to an adjective clause with whose.

  • She has a computer. The processor of it is a Pentium.
    She has a computer, the processor of which is a Pentium.
  • She has a computer. Its processor is a Pentium.
    She has a computer whose processor is a Pentium.

Conclusion:

I hope you have learned using when and where in adjective clause. using prepositions in an adjective clause and using expressions of quantity in adjective clause. in addition, please write your feedback about the article using the comment section below.

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