Grammar

Difference Between Restrictive and Nonrestrictive Adjective Clauses

Difference Between Restrictive and Nonrestrictive Adjective Clauses
Difference Between Restrictive and Nonrestrictive Adjective Clauses

We already have talked about adjective clauses, we said that an adjective clause is used to modify, explain, and give important or extra information about a noun or pronoun that comes in the main clause. Since it cannot stand alone or give a complete meaning by itself, it should be always brought together with a main clause in order to give a complete meaning. An adjective or relative clause is introduced by relative pronouns. In the lesson we will take a look at difference between restrictive and nonrestrictive adjective clauses. 

Difference Between Restrictive and Nonrestrictive Adjective Clauses

Restrictive adjective clause:  

A restrictive adjective clause is also called defining, modifying, or identifying adjective clause. It is used to give essential or important information about the noun in its main clause and does not require commas. If it is removed from the sentence, the meaning of the rest of the sentence will not be clear. The relative pronouns that, which, whom and who can be used in this sort of adjective clause, and the relative pronoun can be omitted if it is formed in objective case.

  • The professor who/that teaches English 1101 is an excellent teacher.
  • The woman whom/that/ you met at my party is a former astronaut.
  • The TV Show which/that/ I watched last night was informative.

Nonrestrictive adjective clause:

A nonrestrictive clause is one that is not necessary to identify the noun that it modifies. A nonrestrictive clause provides additional, but “nonessential” information and requires the use of commas. The deletion of relative pronoun is not possible and the relative pronoun (that) cannot be used in a nonrestrictive adjective clause. Even if it is removed from the sentence, the meaning of the rest of the sentence will be clear.

  • Professor Mike, who teaches English 1101, is an excellent professor.
  • Sally Ride, whom you met at my party, is a former astronaut.
  • Kabul, which is the most populated city in Afghanistan, becomes modern day by day.

 

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1 comment

Anne October 28, 2016 at 9:25 pm

Hi. So interesting site and helpful site for ESL. learners keep going.

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